Irony Definitions

The definition of irony according to 3 sources:

  1. irony: (wikipedia.org)
    the expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.
    ““Don’t go overboard with the gratitude,” he rejoined with heavy irony”
    synonyms: sarcasm, causticity, cynicism, mockery, satire, sardonicism
    “that note of irony in her voice”

    • a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result.
    plural noun: ironies
    “the irony is that I thought he could help me”
    synonyms: paradox, incongruity, incongruousness
    “the irony of the situation”

    • a literary technique, originally used in Greek tragedy, by which the full significance of a character’s words or actions are clear to the audience or reader although unknown to the character.
    noun: dramatic irony

  2. irony: (Google.com)
    i·ro·ny1
    ˈīrənē/
    noun
    the expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.
    ““Don’t go overboard with the gratitude,” he rejoined with heavy irony”
    synonyms: sarcasm, causticity, cynicism, mockery, satire, sardonicism
    “that note of irony in her voice”
    a state of affairs or an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result.
    plural noun: ironies
    “the irony is that I thought he could help me”
    synonyms: paradox, incongruity, incongruousness
    “the irony of the situation”
    a literary technique, originally used in Greek tragedy, by which the full significance of a character’s words or actions are clear to the audience or reader although unknown to the character.
    noun: dramatic irony
  3. irony: (dictionary.com)
    noun, plural ironies.
    1.
    the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning:
    the irony of her reply, “How nice!” when I said I had to work all weekend.
    2.
    Literature.
    a. a technique of indicating, as through character or plot development, an intention or attitude opposite to that which is actually or ostensibly stated.
    b. (especially in contemporary writing) a manner of organizing a work so as to give full expression to contradictory or complementary impulses, attitudes, etc., especially as a means of indicating detachment from a subject, theme, or emotion.
    3.
    Socratic irony.
    4.
    dramatic irony.
    5.
    an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been,expected.
    6.
    the incongruity of this.
    7.
    an objectively sardonic style of speech or writing.

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